The BaitShop Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > FireArms, et cetera > Bowhunting and Archery
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - wow
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the BaitShop Boyz!

wow

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: wow
    Posted: 16 December 2008 at 08:36

I started bow hunting in 1961, using cedar arrow shafts.  Went to aluminum when they came out in the early 1970; terrible not straight and too soft.  one shot bent the arrow.

then started shooting comp with fiberglass arrows very good but heavy and slow for hunting.  In '80 I went back to the new Easton aluminum and have generally been happy with them for hunting and informal target.

This year I thought about going to the carbon graphite.  WOW $6-12 apiece when you buy a dozen shafts without inserts, fletching or point.  punt!

anyone using these expensive rascals?   are they worth it?

Back to Top
hivolt View Drop Down
.416 Rigby
.416 Rigby
Avatar

Joined: 13 October 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 1100
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hivolt Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2008 at 10:28

I use them Bear, very fast and fly very well, pretty good backbone to them also. I like mine.

Rick

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 December 2008 at 11:17

I had three of them 34 years ago. they started to crack axially from the head down.  I used them for raccoon shooting as the full penetration in trees means no arrow recovery.

Still have enough aluminum arrows for the next 6 weeks of archery hunting, but I'm thinking of changing at the start of next year.

The brand of arrow heads (mechanicals) I've been using for 10 years are no longer made.  So I thought I might change everything next year.

BEAR

Back to Top
MtElkHunter View Drop Down
.375 Holland & Holland Magnum
.375 Holland & Holland Magnum
Avatar

Joined: 10 August 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 523
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MtElkHunter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 December 2008 at 09:24
I started bow hunting in 1980 using a recurve bow and no sights (traditional) using aluminum, moved to recurve with sight and finally to a compound. After many years of faster and more high tech bows with carbon arrows, I slowly lost interest in the high tech stuff and went back to recurve and traditional archery.  Are carbons worth it? It kind of depends on how you use them. Carbons are tougher than aluminum but they have there down sides as well.  Here is may take on them..... If you do alot of target shooting and practice and only take a few shots at game then I think they are worth the extra money because they hold up better than aluminum. If on the other hand you do more hunting and take more shots at game you may be better off with aluminum.  My reason is that I think arrows get lost or destroyed while hunting at a much higher rate than target shooting. I hunt from the ground and what happens for me is if I get a pass through I usually don't find the arrow so it is a total loss, If I don't get a pass though then the arrow is usually destroyed no matter what it is made of so it is still a total loss.  What I fugure is it costs me about $5-$10 for each shot I shoot at game with aluminum and $10-$20 for carbon. The price includes the loss of the broadhead also. So for me it all come down to how many times you are shooting at game. A few times a year is only $20 so no big deal but some people I know get 10-12 shots a year, that could add into pretty good dollars. 
SW Montana
Back to Top
deaddog View Drop Down
Administrator
Administrator
Avatar
*AKA The Flying Gun*

Joined: 23 April 2004
Location: Svalbard
Status: Offline
Points: 1479
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote deaddog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 December 2008 at 10:45

The set-up I used this year for hunting: Carbon Express shaft, special fletching, lumma noc, and 2" Rage broadhead cost just over $30 a shot. I launched three of them and recovered them all. They all hit deer (some not in the right place). I credit that to the lumma noc's. Wasn't looking anywhere near where I saw that orange glow. I lost one during practice this year but that didn't have the noc or the broad head. I've  never shot a deer with wooden arrows and only one with aluminum but I see no reason to shoot anything other than carbon. In the last six years I've lost maybe 6 and broke about three. The carbon just shoot so much flatter. If I where using a recurve, aluminum would work just fine, maybe for fishing also?

 

DD

Endeavor to persevere.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2008 at 00:33

Seems the only advantage of carbon is thinner/lighter and therefore shoot flatter.  I'm already faster than I need to be, and always shoot thru.  I hunt ground blinds  and tree stands.  the ground blinds are for portable one day hunts and the tree stands are on areas I hunt two or three times a week.  My shoots are always close 5-23 yards for the last 15 whitetails.

BEAR

 

Back to Top
MtElkHunter View Drop Down
.375 Holland & Holland Magnum
.375 Holland & Holland Magnum
Avatar

Joined: 10 August 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 523
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MtElkHunter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 December 2008 at 08:23

I mostly hunt elk in the timber. When you take a shot in the timber at elk for the most part you can write off the arrow and broadhead. If you miss there is usually only two outcomes. One you hit a tree dead on. In that case your broadhead is toast and you have a 50/50 chance of the arrow being any good. The second and more likley outcome is you hit the tree at a glancing blow. In this case the broadhead and arrow usually are both toast and zing off in some other direction.   If you hit the elk and the arrow stays in the animal it is toast. If you get a pass thru and you don't hit a tree on the other side you can sometime get the arrrow and broadhead back in a usable form.

I have shot high tech bows and light carbon arrow that went well over 300 FPS. I have found that with higher speed equipment things tend to get very querky.  I found that I had more things go wrong and the setup was not very forgiving in shooting form.  The same bow with hearier aluminum arrow was much easier to shoot and did not have as many problems.

I currently have a recurve and a high teck compound and shoot aluminum in the recurve becasue I have found them to be more consistant than wood arrows. In the compound I tried a compromise. I found and shoot some heavier carbon arrows. The carbons are almost as heavy as aluminum and so far have been doing pretty well.

Russ

SW Montana
Back to Top
JUSTN A. MURKAN View Drop Down
.243 Winchester
.243 Winchester
Avatar

Joined: 21 September 2010
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 134
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JUSTN A. MURKAN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 November 2010 at 14:59
Bought a Bear take-down recurve in '73,,,still works,started with alum. arrows & Bear Razorheads,,,am going to cedar and homemade spring steel heads.Got a nice Browning Nomad bow frow early '60's,but bad shoulder wont let me use it

Edited by JUSTN A. MURKAN
If,,in the end all I have is my honor......it will be enough!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest
Guest
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 November 2010 at 15:14

I've got a Browning Nomad  42#; I bought new in 1967.  beautiful and light weight.  I was shooting comp then and had a sight made for it; when hunting back then other archers had never seen a string peep or a movable sight.

I had shot some cedar shafts with it but they didn't have the penetration that the glass arrows did.  I used Bear razorheads for close to 30 years, never had a failure with those blades.  I met Fred Bear and he was a great guy.  He really "made" archery deer hunting as a sport. 

Back to Top
JUSTN A. MURKAN View Drop Down
.243 Winchester
.243 Winchester
Avatar

Joined: 21 September 2010
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 134
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JUSTN A. MURKAN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 November 2010 at 15:22
My Nomad is 60# and I love it,,,but it sits home now.I wish they still made the OLD razorheads,as I am a heavy head man,,,these days I go Zwicky or MA's
If,,in the end all I have is my honor......it will be enough!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.