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Topic ClosedSNOW

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Spot shooter View Drop Down
Left BSB in Disgrace
Left BSB in Disgrace

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Joined: 19 June 2003
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: SNOW
    Posted: 26 July 2003 at 02:15

OK guy's,

   New question, what impacts does snow have on the hunt for the horses.  I would image a little bit of snow 1 -3" wouldn't bother them much except it being slippery.

   What happens when you get 6", or 1 foot, heck for that matter what happen's when you get 3 feet - how much snow can a horse get you through?  And maybe more important what do you do when you get caught in a freak storm.

Spot

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saddlesore View Drop Down
.416 Rigby
.416 Rigby


Joined: 16 June 2003
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2003 at 10:20

Up to 2 ft don't bother them The problem gets bad when it drifts or crust over. I hunted in 3 ft last year , but it was all powder. Just wish I had a taller animal then.

Nasty things can happen  in big storms. If you get stranded and positively can't get out, sooner or late a chopper will probably come and get you. But just you. No gear, no animals, diddly squat. Mostly you are own your own. Best always be prepared for it.  With a few extra days food for you and the animals. Thats' why you want a good sturdy tent that can take all types of weather and keep you warm and dry. It ain't no walk in the park sometimes.

Saddlesore
If God wanted you to walk and carry things on your back, He would not have invented stirrups and pack saddles
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CB900F View Drop Down
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Honor, Integrity

Joined: 10 June 2003
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2003 at 15:05

Spot;

Snow comes in several different varieties.  The more moisture content it has comin' down, the quicker trouble comes.  The real heavy wet stuff breaks branches, collapses tents, & can turn a good trail into an impossible high-wire act in less time than you might think.  The light dry stuff is usually no problem at all, unless it don't quit.  One of the things you want to ask your guide is how much experience they've had in THE area you are going to hunt.  He might be a hell of a hand and a great guide, but micro-climate is not a buzz-word in the mountains.  It'd be a real good idea that he's had at least a coupla years within 20 miles of where you're going to hunt with him.

900F

Birth certificate!? He don't need no steenkink birth certificate!!
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.375 Holland & Holland Magnum
.375 Holland & Holland Magnum
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 July 2003 at 14:19

We get the heavier stuff most of the time. They call it Cascade Concrete at the ski area. One year we ended up with a bit over 3 feet of it during elk season. We had three camps in that year so we divided the trail up and rode it every day with the two biggest horses from each camp to keep the trail packed down enough to get through.

In our camp the water hole for the horses had a drift around it that was a bit over 8 feet high. Some of the horses didn't drink much because it was so closed in.

I like a bigger horse in the mountains for a few reasons. One is that I weigh 200 lb. and a smaller horse has to work too hard to haul my butt around on steep stuff. The other is for crossing creeks and going in snow. I don't like dragging my feet in either, nor do I like to get my rifle wet. I like my ponies to be 16.0 to 16.2 even if they are tougher to get on. I figure I spend a lot more time in the saddle than swinging up on the thing.

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Spot shooter View Drop Down
Left BSB in Disgrace
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 July 2003 at 17:02

Don't know why I hadn't though much about having a decent snow, guess it's cause I haven't hunted anywhere thet gets any in a long time.  I use to hunt in the Adirondacks back in 83 to 86 and I still got a nice pair of snow shoes.

  I haven't really heard to many stories bout elk huntin in snow from these guy's.  Just them that are in this post.

Spot

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.416 Rigby
.416 Rigby
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 July 2003 at 17:02
The worst thing I find about deep snow, is when it is up where your stirrups are dragging in it. I don't know about anyone else, but it wrecks my knees in a few miles. If I'm on a long haul, I can't stand on my own for a while after getting off the horse, and hang onto the saddle until I can walk without falling over. Suppose I'm getting old?
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.416 Rigby
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 July 2003 at 01:44
Last year I was pressed into taking my 13 h Halflinger Mare. Now that is short. It ened up in the deepest snow I have hunted in  for quite a few years. Snow was over my boot tops, amd I was on her. She did ok though. Most of the time we put the 16 h mule in front busting trail
Saddlesore
If God wanted you to walk and carry things on your back, He would not have invented stirrups and pack saddles
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