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Schwäbisches Fleisch

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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aka The Gipper

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    Posted: 02 November 2017 at 13:40

Schwäbisches Fleisch

This recipe comes from Küche Kochen, published by The American Historical Society of Germans From Russia International (1973). It was contributed by Mrs. John Wilhelm of Greeley, Colorado, whose family hailed from Colony Frank, which was on the east bank of the Medveditsa river in the Saratov Province of the Lower Wolga region.

The editors of the book (or the contributors of the recipe) call it "Swiss" Steak, but I believe that is an error, as the translation is actually "Swabian."

Anyway, it looks good - really good; in fact, I think it might even be better with venison, but I would like to try it either way. Having said that, the term "fleisch" might actually refer to almost any meat, and I think that this recipe describes a method more than a specific set of instructions for a specific set of ingredients.

Quote Schwäbisches Fleisch
"Swiss" Steak

To serve 6:

6 thin slices of steak
Salt and pepper
1 tablespoon flour
1 cup concentrated bouillon
1 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon lemon peel, shredded
2 gherkins, chopped
2 Tablespoons parsley
1 Tablespoon onion, chopped

Brush the steaks with drippings and season well with salt and pepper. Broil quickly until browned but still quite rare.

Pour the drippings from the broiler into a stew pan; add 1 tablespoon chopped onion. Work 1 tablespoon of flour into a small amount of fat; blend this mixture into the bouillon and add to the drippings. Add sour cream and remaining ingredients.

Arrange the steaks in this sauce; cover and simmer until steaks are tender.

TasunkaWitko - Chinook, Montana

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Wing master Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 November 2017 at 17:42
That's really interesting Ron. 

My family settled in FT. Morgan Colorado (about 60 miles east of Greeley) and we are related to some Wilhelms. Probably by marrage. My family also came here from Frank. 

I am planning on trying this recipe this weekend. I will let you know how it turns out. If I remember, I might take a few pictures. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 November 2017 at 08:28
That's pretty cool, Randy - I'll enjoy hearing about the results!
 
 
TasunkaWitko - Chinook, Montana

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BEAR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 November 2017 at 08:36
I'm going to try it with elk steaks next week.

Any thoughts on approximate 'simmer' time?  i know until tender...but generally how long do you think?



I'm guessing the name refers to meat from the Duchy of Swabia. this is located in southern Germany, adjacent to Switzerland; so the 'swiss steak' would seem to fit.


Edited by BEAR - 03 November 2017 at 08:42
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 November 2017 at 08:43
Hi, Bear -
 
Assuming a cast-iron pan and a low, low heat setting - just enough to keep it bubbling a bit...I personally would probably try about 12 or15 minutes, mainly because 10 seems too short, and 20 seems too long.
 
Thickness of the steaks is a factor, too, but I am assuming that the steaks will be somewhere between 1/2- and 3/4-inches thick.
 
I'd probably check them at about 12 minutes, and go from there, but the big caveat here is that I would rather have it over-cooked than under-cooked, so my thinking might be skewed.
 
Let me know how it goes - this one really appeals to me.


Edited by TasunkaWitko - 03 November 2017 at 08:43
TasunkaWitko - Chinook, Montana

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BEAR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 November 2017 at 08:23
Since I was asked to report!

I am an intutive cook, not a chef.  so I vary to taste, tasting often.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

So my modifications (major) to Schwäbisches Fleisch:

I used elk tenderloin, sliced into 3/4 "  slices.

Braised in dutch overn with extra virgin olive oil (I love that expression, must be from ugly olives).

Added  1 cup chopped onion.
Tablespoon parsley
one cup chopped green olives w/ pimentos
one cup beef bouillin
1/4 lemon finely chopped (without seeds)
1/2 cup cream cheese (stir to disolve).
1/2 cup bourbon (Old grandad 100 proof-alcohol is gone in 2 minutes but flavor of 100 proof is smoother)
2 oz tomato paste.
1/4 teaspoon od oregano. 
dash of celery seed.

stir, and simmer in dutch oven (like a crock pot on low) for 4 hours.

5 minutes before serving add 3 oz of Triple Sec-  orange flavor.


Serve over wild rice with sweet/sour pickles, marinated artichoke hearts, and olives stuffed with feta cheese.  with one large chilled glass of potato vodka shaken not stirred with  Norwayfeta cheese stuffed  greek olive.


Meat was delicious.
Triple Sec is a tricky way to get the tart flavor of tomato to mellow down.  I did not have any Gerkinss!

No flour was needed as the melted cream cheese thicken it nicely.

Wife loved it.  And it was even better the next day.

Elk flavor seems to hold up nicely to slow cooking.






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 November 2017 at 15:16
That sounds really good, Bear - I'd say that you made some good stuff, there!
 
I plan to get this one on our home menu rotation, either next week or the week after. We'll see how it goes!
TasunkaWitko - Chinook, Montana

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