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Quick Tip for the Week

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15 feb 06

-------------------

Spinners and lures with spinner-type blades have a dual appeal that
accounts for their success in both clear and murky waters. In clear water,
gamefish can spot the flash of the revolving blade from a distance; in
murky water, they use their lateral line sense to pinpoint the vibration
from the turning blade.

Another reason for the success of these lures is the relative ease of using
them. They will produce fish with a simple, straight retrieve. Further,
when a fish strikes a spinner, it often hooks itself.

Used properly, spinner-type lures will catch almost any kind of freshwater
gamefish. These lures will work at any time of year, but are especially
effective when extremely cold or warm water makes fish lethargic and
reluctant to chase anything moving too fast. Most spinner blades will turn
even at very slow retrieve speeds.

Different blades have different amounts of water resistance. A broad
blade rotates at a greater angle to the shaft and thus has more resistance
than a narrow one. A large blade has more resistance than a smaller one
of the same shape.

The greater the resistance, the shallower the the lure will run at a given
speed. Generally, wide blades are best suited to slow retrieves and light
current; narrow ones to fast retrieves and swift current.


Popular blades include 1) Colorado; 2) Indiana; 3) French; 4) willow leaf; 5) fluted, which reflects light in all directions; 6) sonic blade, which spins at high speed; 7) scissor-style blade, which adjusts according to needs and conditions; and 8) buzz blade, which sputters when retrieved on the surface.


Angle of rotation varies with different styles of blades. Colorado-type blades (above) turn at an angle to the shaft approximately 50 degrees; Indiana and French blades, about 40 degrees; and willow leaf blades, about 25 degrees.



Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2006 at 04:09

22 feb 06

------------------

Quick Tip For The Week

Jig Basics:

Many expert fishermen consider jigs to be the most consistently
productive of all artificial lures. They work for a variety of species under
almost any conditions.

A jig is simply a piece of lead, tin or other metal with a hook molded onto
it. A dress-ing of hair, feathers, tinsel or soft plastic generally conceals
the hook. Many anglers also tip jigs with worms, minnows, leaches and
other natural bait.

Use the lightest line practi-cal for the species and fishing conditions if
your line is too heavy, the lure will sink too slowly and not stay at the de-
sired depth when retrieved; also, strikes will be more diffi-cult to detect.
Be sure to use a wire leader when fishing for northern pike, pickerel or
mus-kellunge.

When selecting jigging lures, the main consideration is weight. Your
selection must be a compromise based on the type of fish, water depth,
cur-rent speed and wind velocity. For panfish, most anglers pre-fer lures
of no more than 1/8 ounce. For mid-sized gamefish such as walleye and
bass, 1/4-1/2-ounce jigs normally work best. For larger gamefish, lures
of 1 ounce or more are usually most productive.

The lure must be heavy enough to reach the desired depth, but not so
heavy that it sinks too fast. Fish usually prefer a slowly-falling jig to one
plummeting toward bot-tom. As a general rule, allow 1/8 ounce for every
10 feet of water. For example, a lure of at least 1/4 ounce would be
needed to reach bottom in water 20 feet deep. In slow current, however,
the same lure would only reach a depth of about 15 feet. As the current
becomes faster, the weight of the lure needed to reach bottom increases.

Fishing with jigs:

The most common way to fish a jig is to cast to a likely spot, then retrieve
the lure in short hops along bottom. An-other effective method is to jig
vertically in tight spots or while drifting with the wind or current. When
fish are sus-pended, you can count your jig down to different depths
until you find the most productive level.

Catching fish on jigs re-quires a high level of concen-tration, a fine-
tuned sense of feel and quick reflexes. If you fail to pay constant
attention, if you are not accustomed to rec-ognizing subtle strikes, or if
you do not set the hook imme-diately, chances are you will go home with
an empty stringer. You can improve your jig-fishing skills by following
these guidelines:

• Keep your line taut at all times, especially as the jig sinks; but the line
should not be so tight that it inter-feres with the action of the jig.

• Stay alert for any twitch or sideways movement of the line.

• Watch your line carefully to make sure the jig sinks normally after the
cast and when jigging. If it stops sinking unexpectedly, a fish has
probably grabbed it.

• Set the hook at the slight-est indication of a strike. Do not hesitate; a
fish can pick up a jig and expel it in an instant.

Always tie your jig directly to the line, without snaps, swivels or other
connectors. A loop not such as the Duncan loop will allow the jig to swing
freely, maximizing its action. When fishing for northern pike, pickerel or
muskellunge, attach a striker to your jig using a twist-melt connection or
a haywire twist.

Most serious jig fishermen carry a jig box stocked with a wide variety of
heads and dressings for different species and situations. Often a head
weighing even 1/8 ounce more or less than the one you are using can
make a big differ-ence.



Popular head designs include: 1) ball, which is versatile and fast-sinking;
2) keel, which slices through the water and is ideal for fast current or
deep water; 3) bullet, which is similar to the keel but snags less; 4) slider,
flattened horizontally so that it sinks slowly and glides through water; 5)
mushroom, designed for use with soft plastic tails; 6) banana, which
points the tail up, making the jig ideal for vertical jigging; 7) stand-up,
which has a high-riding hook and is fairly snag-resistant; 8) pyramid,
similar to the banana and stand-up; 9) lip style, giving the jig a wiggling
action; 10) pony with a spinner for extra flash; and 11) propeller, which
adds flash and vibration.



Cast your jig past the “fish zone,” then 1) pay out line as the jig sinks.
When the jig hits bottom, 2) your line will go slack. Tighten your line
slightly, then 3) twitch the rod tip to make the jig hop forward. As the jig
sinks, 4) lower the rod tip slowly to keep the line taut. Keeping a taut line
at this point is the key to success with this technique. Continue to hop
the jig this way until you can no longer maintain contact with bottom.



Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 February 2006 at 07:07
i march 2006

-----------------------------------


Always use a steel leader when fishing for Esocids, which include
northern
pike, muskellunge and pickerel.   The razor-sharp edges on Esocid teeth
are
apparent in this electron microscope photograph. The teeth pierce and
cut
prey better than walleye teeth (inset), which are enarly round. This also
explains why pike and muskies can easily bit off monofilament line, while
walleyes can’t. Esocids are the only freshwater fish that require steel
leaders,
which are unnecessary for any other freshwater fishing.



Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2006 at 07:09
8 mar 06

--------------------------

Corning Big Game:

Corning is a method of meat preservation developed in the days before
refrigeration. After butchering a steer, a farmer would cure the brisket or
some other tough cut in a salt/sugar brine for several weeks. The salt
acted as a preservative, and the sugar developed flavor and tenderness.
Meat cured this way was called “corned” because the salt pellets were
about the size of corn kernels.

On a moose or elk, the brisket, or thin meat that covers the bottom of the
rib cage, is thick enough for corning. On smaller animals like antelope
and deer, it may be too thin. A rolled, boneless shoulder roast will work
well; flank meat, which lies between the last rib and hindquarter, is also a
good choice.

The corning method below requires two types of salt. Canning and
pickling salt is pure salt, without any iodine or free-flowing agents, which
might adversely affect the texture of the meat. Tenderizing salt is a
mixture of salt, sugar and preservatives. It adds flavor and tenderness,
and the preservatives give the meat its characteristic pink color.

To make corned venison, follow this method:

• 2 to 3-pound brisket, flank or shoulder roast up to 1 inch thick.
• 2 quarts spring water or distilled water
• 1/2 cup canning and pickling salt
• 1/2 cup tenderizing salt (e.g. Morton’s TenderQuick)
• 3 Tbs. sugar
• 2 Tbs. mixed pickling spice
• 2 bay leaves
• 8 whole, black peppercorns
• 1 or 2 cloves garlic, minced

Roll brisket, flank or shoulder loosely and tie. Place in large glass or
pottery mixing bowl, or in large oven cooking bag.

In large glass or enamel saucepan, combine remaining ingredients. Heat
just to boiling, then remove from heat and cool. Pour cooled brine over
meat. Cover bowl with plastic wrap; or, if using oven cooking bag,
squeeze to remove air, then twist neck of bag and seal.

Refrigerate 4 to 5 days, turning meat occasionally. Drain and rinse meat
with cold water.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 March 2006 at 07:55
15 march 06

-------------------------------

If you are out at the lake or on the ice and the fishing is especially good,
you might run out of bait. The way perch steal bait, you can spend more
time baiting your hook than fishing.

Two common fish, walleyes and perch, bring their own bait with them.
Try tipping jigs or hooks with these natural baits, which can be used on
the lake or frozen for later use:



Cut the throat tissue out of a walleye by slicing along the dotted lines as
shown. Then cut the tissue loose at the point of the chin. Drive the hook
through the front of the piece of throat tissue. The meat is thicker and
tougher, so the hook won’t tear out. The thin flesh wiggles enticingly,
emits natural scent and is remarkably durable.



Scale the belly of a small perch and cut out an inch-long strip (dotted
lines). Split one end of the strip to form two tails. Hook the other end on
the jog or hook. This bait attracts fish with smell, taste and action.


Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 March 2006 at 09:15
22 mar 06

---------------------

Nearly all of the tips and recipes that are printed in this column come
from one of two sources.

The first is my website, www.baitshopboyz.com, which I started back in
2001. Over the last five years, the BaitShop has grown into an
outstanding web community of sportsmen dedicated to hunting, fishing,
shooting, camping, conservation and generally anything to do with the
outdoors. More than 550 members from every corner of the United States
as well as Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other countries meet at the
BaitShop to swap information, stories and good times. If you would like to
tap into this wealth of information, or simply shoot the breeze with a
group of fellow sportsmen, take a look at this website. This web service is
totally, 100% free of charge; all you need is a computer. Check it out.

A second source that I rely on very heavily is a series of books called The
Hunting and Fishing Library. Originally published by Cy DeCosse
Publishing, the series went on to be published by Cowles Creative
Publishing. To my knowledge, the original series is now out of print, but
books can still be found in bookstores and on the Internet; I have also
seen some copies at K-Mart, Wal-Mart and Shop-Ko. Two very good
Internet sources for these books are amazon.com and ebay.com, where
these books can be purchased for a very reasonable price. Some of the
titles in the series include: The Art of Freshwater Fishing, Cleaning and
Cooking Fish, Fishing Rivers and Streams, Walleye, Northern Pike and
Muskie, Fishing with Natural Bait, Fishing with Artificial Lures, Fishing
Tips and Tricks, the Art of Hunting, Dressing and Cooking Wild Game,
Mule Deer, Elk, Pronghorn and Upland Game Birds. This is just a small
sampling of titles. I highly recommend this series to anyone interested in
reading about hunting or fishing.

As always, I welcome and encourage anyone out there to submit recipes
or tips. They can be sent to me by email at bcj_fischer@yahoo.com or
mailed to Ron Fischer, C/O The Blaine County Journal, POB 279, Chinook,
Montana 59523. Also, if anyone would like to see any specific recipes
printed or has specific questions about the outdoors sports, please let me
know. I’ll do my best to accommodate your request!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 March 2006 at 07:57

Look for early-season walleyes on rock piles in water less than 10 feet
deep. The rocks absorb the sunlight and warm the surrounding water.
Most of the lake is still cold, so walleyes are attracted to these zones of
warmer water. The large rocks also cast shadows where the walleyes can
hide and avoid bright sunlight.

These areas appeal to walleyes for another reason: the warmth attracts
invertebrates, which attract baitfish on which the walleyes feed.
The difference in temperature may be only a degree or two, but it is
enough to make quite a difference.

Some areas along shore are warmer than others, so they draw more
walleyes. Water in a sheltered bay, for instance, warms faster than water
along a straight shoreline because the wind can’t mix it with deeper,
cooler water.

Bays are obvious spots to check, but another type of spot that isn’t so
obvious becomes evident if you have a hydrographic (contour) map of the
lake. Indentations in the breakline (black arrow) function much like bays,
but are not obvious from looking at the shoreline. Sunlight heats the
surface layer of the lake, and if the wind (white arrow) pushes the warm
water toward shore, it will collect in the depression. An indentation on the
downwind side of the lake may have water that is 10 degrees warmer
than nearby shallows.



Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 March 2006 at 06:15

5 apr 06

----------------------------

When jig fishing for walleyes, it is often productive to tip the jig with a
minnow or other live bait. The problem with this is that walleyes tend to
strike at the tail, eliminating any chance of getting hooked. This situation
is called a short strike.

When jig fishing, check your minnow for teeth marks or ripped skin if you
had a short strike but failed to hook the fish. Damaged skin on the rear
half of the minnow means that walleyes are striking short and that you
should add a stinger. A stinger is a small treble hook on a short length of
mono that is attached to the jig and inserted into the tail end of the
minnow (or other bait).

You can attach a stinger to the bend of the jig’s hook; alternately, you can
also attach the stinger at the eye of the jig, leaving the bend of the hook
free so that you can change jig tails or dressings without removing the
stinger.



Any knot can be used to attach the stinger, if you want it to be a fixed
length. If you are using minnows or other bait of different lengths, you
can learn to tie on an adjustable stinger that allows you to change the
length of the mono. To do this:

1. Tie a size 10 treble hook to a length of mono with a Duncan loop (see
below).

2. Attach the loose end to the bend of the jig hook using any fishing
knot.

3. Shorten the mono to fit a small minnow by sliding the knot closer to
the jog hook.

4. Lengthen the mono to fit a larger minnow by sliding the knot toward
the stinger. If the loop closes, you can reopen it with your fingernails.

To tie a Duncan loop,




The normal strength of mono used is 6- or 8-pound; the lighter the
better, so that the minnow can move freely. Sometimes, even this light
mono will inhibit the action of the bait; the line can also wrap around the
minnow, cinching it into a half-circle and ruining its action. If this
becomes a problem, try an alternate method:

Tie a smaller (size 14 or 16) treble hook to the bend of a hook with s
short length of stiff or hard line (any knot can be used), 15-pound test or
heavier. The stiff line holds the treble straight out behind the jig, so you
don’t need to hook it into the bait. The bait moves freely, as if the stinger
wasn’t there at all; however, when a fish nips at the tail, it gets hooked.



Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 April 2006 at 07:57
12 apr 06

There’s no disputing the concept of catch-and-release fishing, but unless
fishermen know exactly how to release their fish, many will die from
mishandling. If you follow these procedures, the fish you release will have
an excellent chance of survival.

• Flatten barbs on hook so that they can be removed without injuring the
fish. By keeping a tight line during the fight, you will seldom lose a fish.

• When playing a fish on a river or stream, move to a location out of the
current. This way, it cannot use the current to its advantage, and tires
more quickly.

• Leave the fish in the water, grasp the hook with a pliers or hemostat,
then shake the hook to release the fish. This way, you won’t remove the
fish’s protective slime, which protects it from infection. Do not squeeze
or touch the gills.

• Cut the leader if a fish is deeply hooked. In a Wisconsin study, 56% of
deep-hooked fish survived when the leader was cut; only 11% survived
when the hook was removed.

• Hold the fish in an upright position facing into the current. Give it time
to recover so it can swim away on its own. If it starts to sink, hold it
upright a little while longer.

• After an especially long battle, the fish might need a little help gaining
its energy back. Hold the fish in the water and gently move the fish back
and forth in the water to get water running through the gills, the fish will
scoot when it is ready.

Above all, do everything you can to minimize stress and fatigue for the
fish. Play it quickly, keep it in the water and handle the fish as little as
possible.
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19 apr 06

---------------------------------------------------

Crankbaits, plugs and “Rapala”-style minnows will catch practically any
kind of gamefish except the smallest panfish species. The key to fishing
these types of lures is to know that they run at different depths and are
most effective within their “optimum” depth. For instance, if you’re
fishing in 8 feet of water, you’ll probably want a lure that runs 6 or 7 feet
deep.

To determine how deep a crankbait tracks, retrieve the lure through water
of a known depth, feeling for it to touch the bottom. If it does, move to
slightly deeper water and try again. Continue until the lure no longer
touches and note the depth. To help you remember how deep your
crankbait runs, write the running depth of each lure on the body or lip
with an indelible marker so you know at a glance which crankbait to use.
Running depths are often listed in catalogs or the instructions that come
with the lures, but it’s best to test them yourself. Different line weights
and retrieve speeds will cause the lures to run at different depths.

A crankbait will not attain maximum depth unless tuned so that it tracks
perfectly straight. Depending on the type of lip, a crankbait must be
tuned by bending or twisting the eye, bending the lip itself or bending the
attachment wire.

To reach maximum depth, cast as far as possible and keep your rod tip
low while retrieving. With a shorter cast or higher rod position, you will
begin pulling the plug upward before it reaches its potential depth. As
noted before, line diameter also affects depth. Thin line has less water
resistance and allows the plug to run deeper than thick line. The smaller
the plug, the more it is affected by line diameter. 6- to 12-pound mono
is usually sufficient for most fishing, but for heavy cover or big fish,
strength up to 25-pound test may be necessary.

For the best action, tie a crankbait directly to the line. If the plug does not
have a split ring on the eye, install one or use a Duncan loop
(demonstrated a couple of weeks ago; if you need a copy, email me). A
heavy leader or snap-swivel will restrict the plug’s wobble.

To keep your lure in the “fish zone” as long as possible, cast parallel to
the structure or cover. For example, to work the shady side of a log, cast
parallel to the log and retrieve the lure along its length. If you cast
perpendicular to a log, your lure will be in the fish zone only a fraction of
the time.


Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 April 2006 at 07:29

For top quality flavor, all fish should be field dressed as quickly as
possible by removing the gills, guts and kidney, all of which spoil fast in a
dead fish.

Field dress fish that are to be cooked whole or steaked. It is not necessary
to field dress fish if they are to be filleted within an hour or two. Scale fish
that are to be cooked with their skin on. Scaling fish is quick and easy
with a scaler, though a dull knife or spoon can be used. Wet the fish and
scrape off the scales, working from tail to head. This job should be done
outdoors, because scales can fly in all directions; or, line the kitchen sink
with newspapers and scale as carefully as possible.

When field dressing and scaling at home, place your catch on several
layers of newspapers to ease cleanup. Before field dressing, wipe the fish
with paper towels to remove slime. This makes it easier to hold the fish
firmly. If you puncture the guts, wash the body cavity with cold water. Use
water sparingly, because it softens the fish.

The head can be removed after dressing. Paper towels are excellent for
wiping off scales and blood spots, and for drying fish.

Field dressing is easier if you have the right tools, and if you clean the
fish in a convenient location. Practice different cleaning techniques until
you can clean fish quickly and with little waste.

To field dress trout and small salmon:



• Slice the throat connection, the tissue that connects the lower jaw and
the gill membrane.
• Insert the knife in the vent, run the blade tip up along the stomach to
the gills, taking care not to puncture the intestines.
• Push your thumb into the throat; pull gills and guts toward the tail.
Scrape out bloodline with a spoon, then rinse out cavity.

To field dress other fish:



• Remove gills by cutting the throat connection, then along both sides of
the arch so the gills pull out easily.
• Insert the knife in the vent, run the blade up to the gills. Pull the guts
and gills out carefully.
•Cut the membrane along the backbone. Scrape out the kidney or
bloodline underneath the membrane, then rinse out cavity.



Edited by TasunkaWitko
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 April 2006 at 12:22

3 may 06

-------------------------------

Some fish recipes for cooking larger fish call for the fish to be "butterflied." This procedure keeps the fish whole while making it boneless. To do this, use the instructions and pictures below as a guide. Start with a whole, drawn fish such as a lake trout or walleye.

Cut from inside cavity along each side of backbone to release bone from fish (Left). Do not cut through skin.

Discard bone and spread out two sides of fish so it lies flat (Right). Trim fat and discard belly meat. Remove rib bones.

"Butterflying" also refers to a preparation method that is a fast and appealing alternative to steaking larger, smooth-skinned fish such as large trout, salmon or catfish.

Normally, these fish are "steaked," which means that they are cut into sections through the backbone along the ribs. When butterflying them, however, you don’t cut through the heavy backbone, so your knife stays sharp. The finished cut is also easier to eat than a steak because it has no bones. Finally, butterflied fillets are more appealing because the meat is on the outside, with the skin and fat tucked away on the inside. To butterfly fillets:

Cut a (1) fillet from the fish. Remove the rib bones, but don’t skin the fillet. (2) Slice across the fillet, about an inch from the end, cutting through the meat but not the skin. (3) Make a second cut, parallel to the first and about an inch farther from the end; slice completely through both the meat and the skin. (4) Fold the piece of fish backwards along the first cut so the meat is on the outside and the skin is on the inside. Butterfly the rest of the fillet, except the tail section.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2006 at 08:25
10 may 06

-------------------------------

The fillets of many kinds of fish contain a row of small bones, called
epipleural ribs, that lie right above the rob cage. Here’s an easy way to
get rid of those bones: 

Remove the row of bones after first locating it with your finger. Slice through the fillet along one side of the bones for the length of the body cavity. Then slice along the other side, forming a thin strip (dotted line) that you can lift out, leaving a completely boneless fillet.

Members of the pike family have delicious, flaky meat; but the Y-bones (above) are bothersome enough that some people refuse to eat these fish. Although there are a couple of ways to remove these bones, most fishermen don’t know how, so they are forced to pick them out at the table. Here’s one easy way to make boneless fillets from pike and pickerel. Then you can forget about Y-bones and enjoy your meal.

Cut down behind the head. Turn the blade toward the tail and run it along the backbone (dotted line). Slice upward just ahead of the dorsal fin, cutting away the back fillet.

Loosen the skin along the edge of the back fillet so it will lie flat on the cutting surface. Now you can skin the fillet as you would any other.

Remove the side fillets by first cutting down to the backbone, once behind the head, and a second time ahead of the dorsal fin (arrows). Feel along the back to find the Y-bones (row of dots). With the fish on its side, insert your knife just above the Y-bones and cut away a fillet (shown) so the Y-bones remain attached to the fish. Remove the fillet from the other side in the same way. Skin the fillets.

Cut off the fillets from each side of the tail section by slicing along the backbone. There are no Y-bones in this part of the fish. Skin the tail fillets. You now have five boneless fillets.



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17 may 06

-------------------------------------

When bottom fishing form shore with live bait, you should keep the line under a little tension so the wind or current doesn’t carry it out; on the other hand, line must pay out when a fish bites or it will feel the resistance and drop the bait. To get just the right amount of tension, try this trick:


Slip a loop of line under a matchstick held to the foregrip with a rubber band. The match will keep the line from drifting away, but will release the line when a fish hits. If the current or wind is strong, increase the friction on the loop by pulling the line tighter to the rubber band. If there is little current, or if you feel that light-biting fish are dropping the bait because they feel resistance, move the line farther from the rubber band. This way, the slightest tug will pull it free.



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24 may 06

------------------------------

Most minnow plugs are either floating or sinking. A standard floating
minnow plug must be retrieved at moderate speed to prevent it from
rising quickly to the surface. Sinking plugs require similar retrieval in
order to keep from sinking into the depths. This means that both styles
are somewhat limited in their useful applications.

There is a third option: the neutrally buoyant plug. This plug will stay
suspended in the water without rising to the top or sinking to the bottom.
A neutrally buoyant plug can be retrieved much more slowly than floating
or sinking plugs, yet it will maintain its depth. Slower retrieves often work
better in cool water or when fish are sluggish.

It is easy for fishermen to doctor their floating minnow plugs to make
them neutrally buoyant:



1. Slip a mono noose over the plug, then pinch on enough shot so the
lure barely sinks and remains suspended in a tub of water. Move the
noose forward or backward to find the balance point.

2. Drill a hole large enough for the shot just below the center line and
directly in line with the position of the noose.

3. Center the shot in the hole, otherwise the plug will tip to one side in
the water. Seal both ends of the hole with epoxy glue.


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31 may 06

 

------------------------------------------------------------ ---------------

 

Most plugs, spoons and spinners come with treble hooks, but if you’re after trophy-class fish, ordinary trebles may not be strong enough. Big-fish specialists know that a good-sized single hook will sink deeper and hold better than a treble, and no fish is likely to bend or break it. If you’re fishing in waters where there’s a good chance of hooking something big, replace your trebles with a single Siwash hook. A Siwash has a sturdy shank and an extra-long, low-tapering point that penetrates like a needle. Once a fish is on, there is little chance that it will get away. Lures with a Siwash hook offer another advantage: they can be used in waters where treble hooks are banned.

 

If the trebles are attached with split rings, you can simply open the ring, take off the treble and substitute the Siwash. If the ring is welded, you’ll have to cut it off and add a new one. If a lure has two or three trebles, you may want to remove all of them and add just one Siwash where the rear treble was.

 

     Changing hooks may disrupt the lure’s balance and ruin its action, so be sure to test it before fishing.

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7 jun 06

----------------------------------------

 

It’s widely believed that the best way to set the hook on a fish is to jerk the rod as hard as you can and “cross their eyes.” A solid hook set will catch more fish, but there’s a better way to sink the hooks than jerking wildly, especially if you’re using monofilament line.

If you have any slack at all in your line, a fast jerk of the rod will exert practically no force at the end of the line. If you find this hard to believe, try the following experiment. Tie a swivel to your line and have someone squeeze it between his fingers. With the rod in your hand, back off about 50 feet. Let out a little extra line and then jerk as hard as you can. Chances are you won’t pull the swivel from your partner’s fingers. Because of the slack and the stretch of the monofilament, surprisingly little force is transmitted.

Here’s a better way to get a powerful hook set. When you feel a bite, point your rod at the fish and immediately reel up slack until you feel weight. Then, set the hook with a quick snap of the wrists.

Although this hook-setting method is much less spectacular, it transmits considerably more force for driving in the hook.



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14 jun 06

-------------------------

Many people do not associate outdoor grilling with fish, but the fact is
that grilled fish has the same delicious, charred-wood flavor as other
grilled meats. Oily fish, such as trout and salmon, are best suited to
grilling because they stay moist despite the high-heat cooking process.
Lean fish, such as walleye or largemouth bass, tend to get dry unless you
select thick cuts.

You can grill steaks, fillets or whole fish. On the average, fish should cook
for 10 minutes per inch of thickness.

Any fish can be grilled, but many freshwater species such as crappie and
walleye have delicate meat that breaks up easily and falls through the
grate. Always grill these fish in a grilling basket or on a grilling screen or
piece of aluminum foil. Fillets or steaks from firm-textured fish such as
northern pike and trout can be placed directly on a well-oiled grill.

If you place a skin-on fillet or whole fish directly on the grate, the skin
may stick. An oil-based marinade not only adds flavor to grilled fish, but
also prevents lean fish from drying out and reduces the chance that the
meat will stick. Coat he fish with marinade before cooking and baste
frequently during the cooking process.

Other tips for grilling fish:

• Remove hardened grease from your grate with a foaming-type oven
cleaner. Keep the grate clean by washing frequently in soapy water. Spray
the grate with nonstick vegetable cooking spray after cleaning it
thoroughly with a stiff wire brush or coarse steel wool and rinsing it with
water. Do not spray the grate over hot coals – the spray may ignite.

• Close the lid and adjust the vents to regulate the heat of the grill. You
can also increase the heat by lowering the grate or bunching the coals
more closely. You can reduce the heat by raising the grate or spreading
the coals.

• Turn the fish after half the cooking time, using a long-handled spatula.
Total cooking time depends on air temperature and wind strength, but
seldom exceeds 10 minutes per inch of thickness.

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21 jun 06

 

------------------------------------------------------------ --------------

 

All knots weaken line; the best have little effect on line strength, while the worst cut strength in half. Two favorites, the clinch knot and the improved clinch, are not recommended, because few fishermen tie them consistently well. As a result, these knots often have sharp bends that fracture under stress. Choose knots that are easy to tie correctly, because even the strongest knot is weak if not properly tied.

 

 

The Trilene knot is unusually strong. It is rated at 90% of the line strength, compared to an average of about 75% for other fishing knots such as the clinch knot.

Here are a few tips for tying knots:

 

·         Moisten the knot with saliva before snugging it up. This reduces friction and helps to form a knot that is smooth and tight.

 

·         Snug up the knot with a smooth, strong pull. Do not be timid about testing it. Better that it breaks while being tied than after hooking a big fish!

 

·         Clip the tag end of the line carefully, being sure not to nick the knot. It pays to leave a little extra line, because all knots slip slightly just before they break.

 

·         Knots weaken with use. Good fishermen tie new knots before a trip and test their knots frequently.

 

There are many, many knots available for anglers. As mentioned before, the Trilene knot is one of the strongest and most versatile. Below are instructions for tying the Trilene knot:

 

 

Pass the line through the eye of the hook twice from the same side. Leave a small loop next to the eye. Wrap the free end of the line around the standing line five times. Then, insert the free end through the double loop next to the eye. Snug up with a firm, steady pull on the line and the hook.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2006 at 06:36
Fishermen catch plenty of good-sized northern pike in the shallow,
weedy bays during the spring, but when the water warms up, they get
nothing but “hammer handles” in these areas. The lack of big pike in the
summer has led to the mistaken belief among some anglers that pike lose
their teeth or have sore mouths this time of year and don’t feed. The
truth is, however, that they are feeding more than ever.

The main reason for the scarcity of big pike in summer is that anglers
aren’t fishing deep enough. As pike get larger, they prefer cooler water.
In some cases, they will congregate around spring holes, artesian wells,
the mouths of trout streams or other specific point sources of cold water;
however, if there are no point sources, pike have no choice but to go
deep.

If there is adequate oxygen in the lake depths, they’ll go as deep as 50
feet and occasionally down to 100. Lake trout anglers sometimes catch
big pike. At these depths, they’re generally feeding on good sized
baitfish, such as whitefish or ciscoes, and you’ll have to use similar-sized
baitfish to catch them. A good rule of thumb is to use a baitfish that is
about one-fourth the length of this northern you plan to catch; thus, you
would use an 9-inch baitfish to catch a 36-inch northern, and so on.
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