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300 H & H Reloading

Printed From: The BaitShop
Category: FireArms, et cetera
Forum Name: Metallic Cartridge Handloading and Bullet Casting
Forum Description: Discuss reloading, bullet casting etc. here. We take no responsibility for the safety or validity of the loads mentioned in this forum. Start low and work up to what is safe in YOUR firearm!
URL: http://www.baitshopboyz.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=1997
Printed Date: 20 November 2019 at 21:21
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 11.10 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: 300 H & H Reloading
Posted By: Athanasius
Subject: 300 H & H Reloading
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 04:08

A lady at work wants to give her husband a reloading setup for Christmas and asked me to research what he needs. He shoots a 300 H & H.

The setup I would pick is:

RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master Reloading Kit

RCBS Die Set

Shell Holder

One box of Nosler Partition 200 Gr bullets

One bag (50) of Winchester Rifle brass

One box of Federal #210 Large Rifle primers

One can of Hodgdon H4350

I am not a reloader myself (yet). What do you think? I am not absolutely sure about the powder choice.

Any suggestions/changes would be appreciated.



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Carl in Colorado Springs



Replies:
Posted By: Rob1
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 04:35
Hey Carl, talk to Fred in Colorado Springs. He is a expert on reloading and the 300 H&H. I imagine he'll chime in here at any moment, if he hasn't already.


Posted By: bkcorris
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 06:00
Hey Athanasius, welcome aboard.

I'm cheap so I got all Lee equipment, it might wear out a tad quicker, but you can't beat the price. H4350 looks to be a good choice. I like Hornady dies, just personal preference. Could also do a Lee Deluxe kit for dies, comes with full length and collet sizer dies, seating die, shell holder and dipper (I use the dippers to trickle powdet) all in a nice case for under $30.

Don't be afraid to ask questions to get yourself into loading, great hobby and lots of fine folks around here to lend a helping hand.



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Stupid people are like a slinky, they don't serve much purpose in the world but they sure are fun to watch tumble down the stairs!


Posted By: CB900F
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 06:23

Athanasius;

I can see one glitch.  The reloading kit is going to include the excellent Speer reloading manual.  However, the Speer manual does not list Nosler bullets.  I would suggest also purchasing the Nosler manual.  As a second choice, forego the Nosler bullets & get the Speer premium bullets in 200 grains.

A bullet is not just like another bullet.  There are significant differences between different makers bullets even in the same bore diameter & weight.  The jacket material may be harder in brand A than brand B, or the surface bearing area can be larger from one brand to another also.  Why does that make an important difference?  Because we really do play with dynamite when reloading.  If the friction down the bore is greater from one bullet to another, the pressure rise that propells the bullet can & sometimes does exceed the ability of the gun to contain that pressure.  We are talking pressures that frequently exceed 50,000 pounds per square inch. 

It never hurts to have two manuals & be able to compare one to the other.  There are reports from time-to-time of mistakes being made in a manual.  Never hurts to have a second scale either.  It's a fun hobby for thousands of us, but it's not a hobby for a daredevil type personality.

900F

 

900F



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Birth certificate!? He don't need no steenkink birth certificate!!


Posted By: Athanasius
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 07:56

CB900F, Thanks for the comment about the manual.  I had actually thaought abotu that, and just got back home from looking at manuals at a local store.  I reviewed the Nosler manual and will suggest she pick one up for her husband.

The more I study this reloading stuff, the more I would like to try it as well.

 bkcorris, I'll take a look at Lee equipment again.  I am not sure if she will have stiker shock over RCBS.



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Carl in Colorado Springs


Posted By: bkcorris
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 08:09
Athanasius,

By all means, if she has no set budget go for the good stuff. An RCBS setup will more likely last a little longer, and they have a better warranty. Does he have other rifles or will he in the future? I doubt he would do high volumes of loading for the H&H, and if it is the only cartridge, top end equipment may not be necessary. I know how feminine types tend to feel on spending money on these kind of things, which is why I opted for more 'inexpensive' equipment.


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Stupid people are like a slinky, they don't serve much purpose in the world but they sure are fun to watch tumble down the stairs!


Posted By: Athanasius
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 08:23

I don't know if he has other rifles.  She just told me he was tired of trying to find ammo for his H&H and it was too expensive, and he wanted a good reloading set.

I've been studying my Cabela's Shooting catalog, and found the Lee Aniversary Kit

I will give her the info on both the RCBS ($260 +) and the Lee Kit ($66) and let her decide.

I am the kind that would pick the RCBS because it looks like a great set, but the Lee will probably do the job perfectly well. 

Also, about the 300 H&H.  Is it roughly the same as a 300 WIN MAG?  I did a search on 300 H & H and found no posts about it.  Interesting.

 



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Carl in Colorado Springs


Posted By: CB900F
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 08:42

Athanasius;

Just my opinion, but I've been around the reloading block a time or two.  Go with the RCBS.  It will outlast the Lee equipment, not by a little bit, but by one hell of a whole lot.  There is no danger of overpaying for it & having it hang around the house collecting dust.  Any of the quality reloading gear will sell in the local paper or on E-bay in minimal time at near-new prices.  Check it out on E-bay, Lee vs RCBS.

900F



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Birth certificate!? He don't need no steenkink birth certificate!!


Posted By: bkcorris
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 08:51
The 300 Win Mag is more common than the H&H wich offers less availability of info for the H&H, but, there is plenty of info out there if you look. Ballisticlly they are pretty similar.

Quick data w/H4350

150 horn SP
300 H&H 71gr 3202 fps
Win Mag 72gr 3205 fps

165 Nos Part:
300 H&H 69gr   3164 fps
Win Mag 71.5gr 3110 fps

Don't hold these for gospel.

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Stupid people are like a slinky, they don't serve much purpose in the world but they sure are fun to watch tumble down the stairs!


Posted By: tj3006
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 10:26

    Good choices all except i would let the shooter buy the bullets. Most 30 caliber shooters seem to prefer 180 grain, and some 165. Thee are lots who shoot the 200 but I think a 30.00 box of partitions might be a waste .

          ...tj3006



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Freedom 1st tj3006


Posted By: Triggerguard
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 10:59
I would question buying just Nosler partitions. Pretty expensive bullet to shoot into the backstop all the time. Would suggest him learning with some of the standard .30 caliber bullets by Speer, Hornady, or Sieera. He can wait on the Noslers until he has some experience and is ready to work up a hunting load.

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"...A moral compass needs a butt end.Whatever direction France is pointing-towards collaboration with Nazis, accomodation with communists,...we can go the other way with a quiet conscience"-O'Rourke


Posted By: dakotasin
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 15:08

go rcbs. you can beat it, but it takes a lot of money to do it.

let the shooter buy his own bullets... he may be more interested in working w/ something else. if she just wants to get him everything he needs to get the ball rolling, suggest a 165 or 180 sierra gameking, or hornady btsp.

you'll need to include some calipers, too (these can be cabela's brand, or whatever... ~$25). i would reccomend going w/ federal magnum primers instead of standards, especially if the weather can get chilly where you are.

good call on the brass... for powder, also have a peek at the rl-series. good stuff. hodgdon is good, too...

reloading is so much fun because of all the variables, and the reloader can control all those variables.



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Hunting is not a matter of life or death; it is much more important than that.


Posted By: Athanasius
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 17:06

Man I am amazed at the number of responses.  Thanks - and keep 'em coming.  I think I will tell her to let her husband make the decision about his own bullets and powder.  I was looking at the Cabela's catalog some more and found the RL and IMR powders.  How do you make a desicion on powders? 

I appreciate the comment about the cost of Noslers, but you also want to work up your best round, right? If you work up what you hunt with you make the investment, but shooting premium bullets through paper does seem to be a waste.

What are calipers used for?  I assumed the magnam primers would be for large bore rifles like 338 or 375 H & H and up.

Boy do I have a lot to learn! 

I have not come close to loading one round and am hooked.



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Carl in Colorado Springs


Posted By: Guests
Date Posted: 08 November 2003 at 19:10

 

The .300 H&H is meant to stretch more than any other cartridge so make sure that you have a trimmer in there. This is not a criticism of the .300 H&H just a fact. I own a .303 British and they stretch like somthin' shockin' as well. Hell I only use a LEE LOADER for my .303 but they don't FLS the case and a lot of my reloaded cases a getting to tight for the chamber. This means I gotta by a die set for it now! I know, I know I'm a tight arse!

Russ.



Posted By: dakotasin
Date Posted: 09 November 2003 at 01:54

calipers (micrometer) are useful for a lot of things, but the reloader needs 'em for measuring cartridge overall length, and they are useful for making sure dies are set up properly, and any other critical measurement.

the primer type is more often dictated by the amount of powder a case holds, and not the the caliber of the cartridge. most guys switch to mag primers for cartridges that hold about 60 grains of powder. some more, some less. magnum primers are insurance for loads that will see cold weather and have to ignite 50-60 grains of powder (or more).

i use magnum primers in my 7 rem mag, 300 wsm, and 338 win mag. all 3 of these cases hold about 70 grains of powder. i sometimes use magnum primers in my 25-06 (less than 60 grains). i use standard primers for the 308, 243, etc (notice the labeling of the cartridge... magnum primers for magnum cartridges, standard primers for non-magnum cartridges).



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Hunting is not a matter of life or death; it is much more important than that.


Posted By: Athanasius
Date Posted: 09 November 2003 at 02:02

Thanks for the explanation about calipers and primers.

I have a couple more questions.

How do you determine how deep you set the bullet (hence the caliper) and is there a book I can start reading about reloading so I donít expose my utter ignorance publicly any more?



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Carl in Colorado Springs


Posted By: mr mom
Date Posted: 09 November 2003 at 02:35

 athanasius:  most reloading books list a C.A.L cartrige overall leigth. its a good start. but there are gauges to mesure the bullet length. every bullet will be diffrent. befor these gauges came out they use to smoke a dummy cartrige. this is some of the other things that you will find out.  i still have a book that i got when i started to reload 30 some years ago. and i still  look at it . and when my kids started to load i  made them read it.  its called the a b c's of reloading. but the reloading manuals have good info in them also. get a reloading book and start at the front and read to the back.

  as far as mag. primers the load data will tell you if you need to use them. the only time i have use them is when i reload and its going to be cold out . i will use them to get a hotter spark. all this is talked about in the reloading books. when you start to reload and see how much better the rifle will shoot with hand loads the more you will get into it. just dont try to get everything at once.  pick up all the catologs you can find. call rcbs, lyman, and lee they will all send catologs. these books are just as helpful as a good reloading book.

 i am still useing a rcbs jr.my first press after 30 years and it works out just fine

 



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mr mom


Posted By: dakotasin
Date Posted: 09 November 2003 at 14:21

mr mom has your questions covered pretty well... i'll expand a touch.

for the length to seat the bullet... this is an individual's preference. i seat my bullets out as long as i can. sometimes the length is dictated by the magazine, in more preferable cases, the length is dictated by land and groove engagement. i use a variation of the 'smoke' method mr mom spoke of. i make up a dummy (no powder or primer) cartridge w/ the bullet just barely seated. then, i put the dummy in the gun, and force the bolt closed... this will give you a ballpark figure of how long you can seat a bullet (and this initial measurement will be too long, and probably unsafe, so don't stop here). from there, i keep screwing the seating die down until i come off the lands. how far off depends on the rifle. once you have the maximum c.o.l., mark the case w/ a sharpie w/ the bullet data, and save it. from now on, when you set your dies up to use that bullet, use the dummy, and die set up is fast and accurate. each different bullet weight/style/brand gets its own dummy...

speer #13 is an excellent manual and will give you some great general guidance. the reloading manual will tell you where a mag primer is reccomended, and will tell you how long to seat your bullets to be within saami specs.



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Hunting is not a matter of life or death; it is much more important than that.



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