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5.56/.223 again

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Irish Bird Dog View Drop Down
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    Posted: 13 May 2014 at 17:25
I have read about the leade difference with the 5.56 & .223 Rem.  Have never seen any reloading dies labeled for 5.56

So, the question becomes this: when you use standard .223 Remington dies to load military 5.56 brass....what do you end up with? 

Regards to chambering: does the resized 5.56 brass then become a .223 Rem case or is the leade still a factor?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CB900F Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 May 2014 at 00:59

IBD;

A large part of the difference is in the brass itself.  True 5.56 brass will have the NATO designator (cross in the circle) symbol in the headstamp.  That brass will be heavier than commercial brass, because NATO use includes the SAW fully automatic machine gun.  Therefore, NATO 5.56 brass has less internal volume than commercial brass & you'll get a higher pressure spike with NATO brass for a given weight of powder and the same bullet.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RobertMT Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 May 2014 at 19:04

I've weighed a bunch of brass, 5.56 isn't neccessarly heavier.  7.62x51 is most often heavier than .308, people expected same on 5.56.

If you load for 5.56 chamber, you can load a bit hotter, than .223 chamber.  If you load 5.56 brass to 223 pressure, you can shoot it safely in either.

I have couple ARs with 223 match chamber, they're setup for 77gr bullets, loaded mag length, with .010" jump.  If you shot a 5.56 62gr  green tip rd, bullet would be jammed, if it fully chambered, along with higher chamber pressure, you would blow primer.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Irish Bird Dog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 May 2014 at 11:56
Well, two different opinions/thoughts on the brass thickness of 5.56 stuff.  My AR is chambered 5.56/.223 so I don't have any issues there I believe. Was just wondering....thicker brass could be a factor if it is truly the case (pun intended).....I load to .223 sporting load data anyway so should be reasonably OK.

Meanwhile I found this site:
http://www.razoreye.net/mirror/ammo-oracle/AR15_com_Ammo_Ora cle_Mirror.htm

Lots of "info" here for sure....didn't find a definitive answer to whether NATO/military brass is thicker than .223 (Remington) caliber civilian brass.


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