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>308 Question

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Tikkabuck View Drop Down
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**Robert E. Lee IV **

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tikkabuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: >308 Question
    Posted: 16 October 2014 at 08:31
Anybody read this section ? LOL Problem ,my Winchester Model 88 , I have load with 150grs I have used in it for a long time, I get consistent 1 1/2" groups with it, good enough for hunting here in the thick stuff. Well I found out about another load using 165grs I wanted to try, and yikes, with this load I was stacking them ,I had no idea this old gun could shoot so well . Problem is out of 8 shots, all but 1 had a split case neck . Same good brass, as all my other loads, so I went back to my old loads, not one split . What's going on ?
God,Mother,Country,and Hot Rods. Done with political crap.LOL
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deaddog View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote deaddog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 October 2014 at 16:24
A few ideas but a few questions first.

Did you trim?

Did you crimp?

Black soot on the neck?

Trimming many time takes away the weak part of the brass before a
split can start.

Crimping for a lever like that can weaken the case mouth. Annealing
can help as well as the trimming.

Black soot s usually a sign of too slow a powder. The bullet leaves
before the case seals to the chamber. That can cause splits too.

Not sure how many .308's you have but using the same brass in the
same gun can help extend case life too.

Good luck.

Dad
Endeavor to persevere.
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Tikkabuck View Drop Down
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**Robert E. Lee IV **

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tikkabuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 October 2014 at 21:20

Hey There

 Yes black soot . Do trim , don't crimp , Same brass in the same gun , Most maybe 2 nd time reloaded .

God,Mother,Country,and Hot Rods. Done with political crap.LOL
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MtElkHunter View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MtElkHunter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 October 2014 at 11:02

Interesting problem.

Could you be seating the bullet to long? A bullet that just stops short of the rifling usuall is more accurate but if it touches it can raise the pressure enough to split necks.

Second thought is like DD said you could be using the wrong powder. Try the power you used for a 150 grain for the 165. You probably will need to reduce the charge a few grains becasue of the heavier bullet.

SW Montana
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BEAR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 October 2014 at 12:33
try micrometer ing the newer bullets and check vs the old ones.
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